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Obviously by now the majority of us have heard of the Trayvon Martin case and the injustice that has taken place. And as much as you’ve heard that I’m sure you’ve also heard the desperate pleas for you to help via reblogging and retweeting. "Reblog/Retweet this and $1gets donated to the Trayvon Martin foundation. This foundation is trying to combat racism " Not only is this a disgusting attention seeking ploy for popularity online at the cost of a child’s grave sight but that is for another post as for now…

May I ask who in their right mind thinks that money is the direct answer to combat racism? Sure they can use that money to educate people about racism and the heinous situations that have been caused by it. But education does not solve racism. For do we not complain about he lack of diversity with in the higher working establishments? Yes we do. So if those highly educated and wealthy people are making these decisions based on what is believed to have been prejudice beliefs then obviously racism can not be tackled by the mere funds of the foundation.

I believe racism is a breed of pride. The pride that people have of their own race diminishes the understanding that they have towards others. When this understanding is diminished then in turn we get the diminish of acceptance. The acceptance of difference and variety, as well as diversity.
How can this be tackled? I would suggest we remove the differentiation for holidays within schools and such. For instance, I can only speak of my own experience, but I was raised in the UK and in my school we got all the Christian holidays off as a national holiday due to the fact that it was a christian country. Yet when Eid or Hannukah or any other holiday came only the certain children that were of that religion would be excused off of school. What I have found is that because of the other kids sharing the Christian holidays with them that they instantly grew an understanding and acceptance of it. Where as in some cases the Christian children would be lacking that understanding and would be more likely to utter crude remarks.

Now that’s a religious and cultural example but it could tie in with things such as Black history month. Is there really a need to seclude a month for citizens when we are all trying and fighting to be one? Should there in that case not be a White history month? An Asian history month? And so on. Yes there are reasons behind there being a month secluded to Blacks but if we demand equality in today’s society we need to let go of yesterdays wrong doings. Sure it is acceptable, in fact it is important to learn of this history but it is no longer necessary for the seclusion of the month.

This is not to say that the “Stop Kony” movement is completely bogus but it’s not that hard to see where there could be a hidden agenda. Let us not be naive.


- with that said, I do hope Kony is stopped. 

I, personally think that we’re actually losing humanity in search for humanity. We forget to care just because we care and only care when it’s too late. We care when the people/places/animals or things we care about have already been damaged instead of caring enough when all was well to deter the damage. I call that the “Superhero” state. We only seem to realise about our abilities and capabilities to help when all is too late. We’re all so quick to be saviours when others are in need but we don’t linger around when others could use a helping hand to do/feel/be in a greater mental/physical/spiritual condition. When I say “we” I can not forget to include myself.

People think its cool to care when they feel the pressure of the media pressing an issue but once it’s no longer making headline news it’s suddenly forgot. It’s even sadder that most people live in the “Fuck your feelings” or the “I don’t give a fuck” state of mind as of late. Well people in our generation anyway. It’s surely going to catch up with us as a whole, of that I’m sure.